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Prisons have unnecessary luxuries

This hotel has the same luxuries given to those in prisons, yet people in prison have them for free. Cutting down these luxuries in prisons will save millions of dollars nation wide.

This hotel has the same luxuries given to those in prisons, yet people in prison have them for free. Cutting down these luxuries in prisons will save millions of dollars nation wide.

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You walk into a room, it has a bed, a TV, a couch its own bathroom, and yes, even Wi-Fi. This sounds like a hotel room or any typical house right? Wrong. Its’s a prison cell. Prisons in the United States have too many comforts; prisoners have more than what some of our working citizens and veterans can afford.

When arrested for a crime, most often the case, the sentence is prison. Whether it’s for 6 months or 6 years, it should feel like a punishment. When someone leaves prison they should not want to go back, but 40% of ex-cons commit crimes within three years of their release that ends them back in jail. This could be because conditions are much more pleasant in prison than out on the streets. In prison, there are luxuries that hard working citizens, who never committed a crime acquire. The New York Times discussed certain luxuries most prisons have, “In most prisons in America, prisoners have too many rights. They are allowed to have small television sets, food, drinks, magazines, books, and some security. To the poverty stricken who lack housing, daily meals, protection from others, and entertainment, prison might sound like a step up. This should not be the case. Citizens in America should tremble at the sheer thought of going to prison. Prisoners should be given no access to entertainment and, instead, should spend their entire time paying their debt to society in miserable solitude in addition to hard labor.”

Although prisons keep dangerous people off the streets, they can get off early for good behavior, and someone who committed murder is now free after 15 years instead of 25. Instead of letting criminals free early to save money, cutting the needless amenities would save the US millions of dollars. 734 out of every 100,000 people are behind bars in the US; far and away the highest number in the world. Typically parole programs cost taxpayers $7.47 per day per parolee, while prisons cost $78.95 per day per inmate nationwide. Some prisoners cost more. It costs New Jersey $253 million every year to house just its death row prisoners — $11 million a piece.

As of 2017, 19 off the 50 states made death by execution illegal. As the death penalty disappears, it’s being replaced by life without parole. If someone is to spend the rest of their life in jail, with no chance of freedom, should they still have all the luxuries and waste tax payers money all across the nation? No, it is pointless and uneconomical to allow people who have wronged society to live in better living circumstances then some hardworking citizens. About 33% of Americans are struggling financially and tax money going to prisons is no help. Despite budget cuts and tax shortfalls housing inmates costs the country almost $600 billion a year.

While prisons still have the luxuries that hotels have, the average tax paying citizen will suffer the consequences. Cutting these luxuries will not only save money on taxes, but also help bring the nation out of trillions of dollars in debt. Cutting luxuries in prison will also reduce the rate of returned criminals, because prison will be much more of a punishment and undesirable. Overall, reducing the luxuries, such as: a TV, magazines, and in some prisons the option to take college classes, will benefit the American economy in many ways.

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Prisons have unnecessary luxuries